Kumbalgarh - Quick Facts

Area: 6.5 sq. kms

Population:144231.

Altitude: 3000 feet

Climate: Summers extremely hot with chilled winters

Clothing: Summer - Light Tropical’s & Winter - Light Woolens

Season: Winter - Oct to March & Summer - April to June | Our Suggestion - September to March

Fauna: Panther,slot bear,wild boar,four horned antelope

Attractions: the fort claims to be having the second longest wall in the world

Language: Rajasthani, Hindi & English

Best Time To Visit: Oct-Mar




In Rana Kumbha’s time the kingdom of Mewar spread from Ranthambore to Gwalior. Including vast tracts of present-day Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. Mewar’s rulers become patrons of all that was best in Indian martial and fine arts, architecture and learning. Of the 84 fortresses defending Mewar, 32 were designed and built by Rana Kumbha. Of these, Kumbalgarh with its 36-kilometer long wall and soaring towers is the most impressive.
Kumbhalgarh stands on the site of an ancient citadel dating back to the second century AD belonging to a Jain descendant of India's Mauryan emperors. It defined the boundaries between Mewar and Marwar and became a refuge for Mewar's rulers in times of strife. Its steel gray ramparts encircle the fertile Shero Mallah Valley, with ancient monuments cenotaphs, ponds and flourishing farms.
Kumbhalgarh fell only once in its history to the combined forces of Emperor Akbar, Raja Man Singh of Amber, Raja Udai Singh of Amber and Raja Udai Singh of Marwar.

Located in the southern part of Rajasthan (close to Udaipur), Kumbalgarh is an interesting tourist destination. Some of the tourist attractions worth visiting at Kumbalgarh are Haldighati, Muchhal Mahavir, Kumbalgarh Fort and the Kumbalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary.

By Air
Udaipur is the nearest airport from Kumbhalgarh, which is serviced by regular flights to and from cities like Delhi, Mumbai and Jaipur.

By Rail
The nearest Railhead from Kumbhalgarh is Udaipur. The railway network links Udaipur to Delhi, Mumbai, Jaipur and other cities of India.

By Road
Kumbhalgarh is well connected to Udaipur, which in turn is linked to other major cities in Rajasthan, Gujarat and other neighboring states.

Kumbalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary
Kumbalgarh is just 90 kms. from Jodhpur on the Udaipur - Pali - Jodhpur road. This jungle adjoins the historical Kumbalgarh Fort and used to shield the fort from invaders. Now it protects the rare species of animals, struggling for their survival. Situated in the lush green region of Udaipur, Kumbalgarh is the only sanctuary of Rajasthan, where activities of the rarely found wolf can be seen. More than forty wolves inhabit the Job area of the sanctuary. During summer, when water becomes scarce, pack of wolves roaming around water holes is a common sight.

Haldighati
The scene of the famous battle off 1576 AD fought between Rana Pratap-the heroic son of Udai Singh and the massive forces of the Mughal Emperor Akbar. A beautiful Chhatri (Cenotaph) with white marble columns, dedicated to Rana Pratap stands here.
The famous battlefield of Haldighati is also marked by a small chatri which commemorates the warrior's horse Chetak. Although badly wounded and exhausted, this brave horse carried Maharana Pratap to safety before collapsing and dying. It is for this loyalty and courage that Chetak is honored.

Kumbhalgarh Fort
Rana Kumbha
got the Kumbalgarh fort constructed in the 15th century. One of the few forts in Rajasthan that have remained unconquered. Kumbalgarh was also the birthplace of Maharana Pratap, Mewar's legendary king. The attractions of the fort include a number of fascinating palaces and an array of temples inside it. The fort is enclosed by a thick wall, running up to 36 kms and offers a splendid view of the surroundings.

Muchchal Mahavir
The Muchhal Mahavir temple is situated about five kms from Ghanerao in the Kumbalgarh Sanctuary. Its distinctive feature is the statue of Lord Mahavir with a mustache. The two statues of elephants guarding the gateways are splendid examples of temple decoration. In the vicinity are the Garasia tribal villages famous for their colorful costumes.

Rajsamand Lake
One of the popular excursions around Kumbhalgarh, Rajasthan is the Rajsamand Lake, situated on the way to the city. A splendid dam was built on the lake in the 17th century. On the banks of the lake are stunning torans (arches), chhatris (cenotaphs) and a number of gorgeous pavilions. The embankment below houses a Rest House of the Irrigation Department, adorned with a magnificently laid out garden. Stunning sculptures and Sanskrit verses vividly inscribed in store are the other attractions of the lake.

Ranakpur Jain Temples
Ranakpur is one of the five pilgrimage places of the Jain community. Rana Kumbha laid down the foundation of Ranakpur in the 15th century. The main temple of Ranakpur is the Chaumukha (four faced) Temple, dedicated to Adinathji, the first Jain Thirthankar. The temple has 29 halls and 1,444, all of them carved distinctly. There are two other temples also, devoted to Parasvanath and Neminath, facing the main temple. These temples have exquisite carvings, quite similar to that of Khajuraho. Nearby is the Sun Temple, dating back to the 6th century. It is adorned with polygonal walls, ornamented with carvings of warriors, horses and solar deities driving fabulous chariots.

Ghanerao Royal Castle
Ghanerao is a small town near Kumbhalgarh. The main attraction of this place is the magnificent Ghanerao Royal Castle, which has now been converted into a hotel. Nearby the castle are the royal cenotaphs and a Jain temple dedicated to Lord Mahavir.

Navachoki Mamadeva Temple
Constructed by Maharana KUMBHA (1433-1468); situated in a gorge below the fort. It houses an image of Kuber (the Hindu god of wealth) and contains several black marble slabs, the earliest of which dates back to 1491. They are inscribed with the history of Mewar, the fourth slab of which has been published. There are also two chhatris (pavilions), commemorating Maharana Kumbha, and his grandson, PRITHVI RAJ who, though the Crown Prince, was exiled from Mewar because of a fight with his brother, Sanga, and became a celebrated adventurer.


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